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AFTD Webinar: Brain-Behavior Connections in FTD - February 17, 2021

AFTD Webinar: Brain-Behavior Connections in FTD - February 17, 2021

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Learn about the connection between changes in the structure of the brain and behavioral symptoms during a webinar on Wednesday, February 17, 2021.

Learn about the connection between changes in the structure of the brain and behavioral symptoms during a webinar on Wednesday, February 17, 2021. Hosted by The Association for Frontotemporal Degeneration, the 90-minute presentation begins at 4:00 p.m. Eastern Standard Time (1:00 p.m. Pacific).

The featured presenter will be Lauren Massimo, Ph.D., an Assistant Professor at the University of Pennsylvania in the School of Nursing and the School of Medicine, Frontotemporal Degeneration Center. She will:

  • examine structures in the frontal and temporal lobes of the brain that underlie cognition and behavior
  • explore how patterns of brain atrophy produce behavioral symptoms in FTD
  • help participants understand the basis of behavioral symptoms in FTD in order to develop effective care strategies 

The cognitive and behavioral changes experienced in FTD are closely related to the loss of neurons in the frontal and temporal lobes of the brain. Understanding the connection between changes in the structure of the brain and behavioral symptoms is important for understanding the disease. 

Knowledge of the neuroanatomical basis of FTD can help family caregivers, persons diagnosed, and healthcare providers better understand behaviors and develop care strategies to maximize quality of life. 

This online event can handle up to 500 attendees. Pre-registration is required. Registration is limited and is accepted on a first-come, first-served basis. Sign up today!

If you are unable to watch the webinar live, the presentation will be recorded and can be viewed on the AFTD website within one week of its broadcast. 

WATCH Brain-Behavior WEBINAR

Over a decade-long career as a nurse practitioner in cognitive neurology, Dr. Massimo has enjoyed the opportunity to work with and support many patients with neurodegenerative disease and their families. Her research program focuses on identifying the cognitive and neural basis for symptoms of neurodegenerative disease. 

Dr. Massimo holds a bachelor’s degree in nursing from The Pennsylvania State University and a master’s degree as an Adult and Gerontology Nurse Practitioner from the University of Pennsylvania. She is also a graduate of the Ph.D. program at the University of Pennsylvania. 

She has received numerous grants and awards including the John A. Hartford Foundation Building Academic Geriatric Nursing Capacity pre-doctoral fellowship, two National Research Service Awards, and the AFTD Nonpharmacological Therapies and Tools for FTD. 

She is currently funded by the National Institute on Aging (NIA) for her work on cognitive reserve in young-onset dementia. 

This webinar is part of The Association for Frontotemporal Degeneration’s education series.